12 Comments

  1. Cheryl

    Hi Martina, you offer a lot of good advice from start to finish for people who are just starting off jumping with their horse.

    I have always loved horses and always wanted my own when I was younger but that was never going to happen. I used to go to a riding school on a Saturday morning and loved it but never ever got round to doing any jumping – I’m hoping to actually get into it again which is how I stumbled across this post. 

    Also, I love to watch is the Horse of the Year show, especially the horse jumping and the dressage.

    • Martina

      Hey Cheryl, 

      So happy you’re thinking of picking up riding again! Its great for a whole host of reasons – I actually wrote a post about it haha 

      Let me know if you need any other help 🙂 

      Cheers, 

      Martina 

  2. Jack Taylor

    My father was a Jockey so I have lots of experience with horses and absolutely love them. I just finished reading your article on English Horseback Riding: Learning to Jump on a Horse. My daughter is a great rider and has an interest in Equestrian riding. We wanted her to be a Jockey like her grandpa but her decision is hers to make. I saved your article for her to read and saved your website to my favorites. Thanks for a great article.

    Jack

    • Martina

      Hey Jack,

      That’s incredible! I’m not too familiar with horse racing myself – I’m more on the side with your daughter into English and Western riding, especially showjumping. If she’s already jumping, it may be a little bit basic for her but if she skims through it, there are some more advanced points I throw in here and there 🙂 

      Cheers, 

      Martina 

  3. Jonathan

    Great tips and training on learning how to jump on a horse. I will try this from a-z. I believe in your words and can tell you are confident that this will work. From what you’ve said, I have to be confident too. I will maintain control of the horse during and after the jump. Thanks for all of your help.

  4. Hey girl,
    You did a fantastic job on this article. It was thorough and I could really see myself doing it! Your instructions were clear and concise. It was very easy to tell you have a distinct connection with horses. I wanted to be an Equine Psychotherapist, but I was already to old to begin my training. That’s for the young pups. I think you are on the right track, don’t lose sight of your dream. Great job!

  5. Karen Couchman

    Hi Martina,

    Your article has brought back so many happy memories as I grew up in a riding school. Many of our students were recruited to the Sydney mounted police from our academy. Sadly I was too short.

    I have younger girlfriends who are still very active in eventing and western as we all have farms out this way. They sent me a youtube link called “Dressage meets Cowboy”. I wish I could give you the link as I am sure you would have enjoyed it as much as I did.

    I do have a question. At what point when your horse is airborne do you signal a change of lead at the canter?

    I am looking forward to your reply.

    Kind regards
    Coucka

    • Martina

      Hi Karen, Awww I’m so happy to hear that! Do you still ride at all? As soon as I’m jumping I’m looking in the right direction and positioning my body. Right as I’m about to land is when I usually start giving the signal and then really squeeze as we’re landing. Usually looking in the right direction and positioning your body will be enough for a horse you have a great connection with but some horses will need more of a queue 🙂 Hope that helps! 

      Warmly, 

      Martina 

  6. SmileAfresh

    Hi Martina,
    Thanks for that eye opening post. I didn’t know that horseback riding has so much to learn about! I usually admire how that horses have such a huge and interesting history in battles and as a sport.
    For a green beginner who would be very far away from even attempting a jump, what breeds would you recommend for them to start with as they develop the skills to professional horseback racing?

    • Martina

      Hey there, 

      It’s not so much about the breed as it’s about how to horse is raised and their disposition. Look for a barn nearby with some docile trail horses to start off with 🙂 

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